Safari Club International Foundation Testifies In Support Of International Wildlife Conservation Funding

For Immediate Release: July 28th, 2011

 

Washington, DC –Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) testified today in front of the U.S. House of Representatives Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans and Insular Affairs Subcommittee of the House Natural Resources Committee in support of H.R. 50, the Multinational Species Conservation Funds Reauthorization Act of 2011 which would extend funding for important conservation projects until the year 2016.

 

“It was an honor to testify before the committee today, and I hope that our message was clear: that these projects are a needed investment for sustainable wildlife conservation,” said Joseph Hosmer, President of SCIF. “Support for international conservation projects is necessary for the continued growth of wildlife populations and stability of rural economies throughout many nations of Africa and Asia.”

 

As a result of the funding from the U.S. Congress, many grants, matching contributions, and in-kind funds have been donated to these programs from other organizations, host countries, and conservation groups. For example, as a result of the 2009 Congressional appropriation of $2 million for the African Elephant Conservation Fund, over $11.2 million in matching funds were received from outside sources and went to fund 33 African elephant projects.

 

Contact: Nelson Freeman, Media@safariclub.org

About SCIF

Safari Club International Foundation is an international non-profit 501(c)(3). SCIF’s mission is to support and promote hunting as a major benefit for wildlife conservation and the sustainable use of wildlife and to fund and manage worldwide programs dedicated to wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian services. Learn more at: www.safariclubfoundation.org.

 

Becoming an SCI Member

Joining Safari Club International is the best way to be an advocate for continuing our hunting heritage and supporting worldwide sustainable use conservation, wildlife education and humanitarian services. JOIN NOW:  www.safariclub.org/Join.

 

The WILD Foundation, Safari Club International Foundation Combat Rhino Poachers

For Immediate Release: All Media

April 21, 2011 – Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) and The WILD Foundation (WILD) announced that they are working together to combat rhino poaching in South Africa through the Rhino Informant Incentive Fund (RIIF). The RIIF provides financial incentives to economically underdeveloped rural communities where rhino poachers reside. Local individuals will act as informants, to assist local law enforcement in apprehending poachers and confiscation of horns, weapons, or equipment.

“SCIF has successfully concentrated many of our financial resources into anti-poaching efforts in the last few years,” said SCIF President Joseph Hosmer. “We are excited to work with The WILD Foundation through our contribution to the Rhino Informant Incentive Fund. By working collaboratively against international poaching we will ensure sustainable-use conservation and hunting can continue.”

“We already see results with the first prosecution, validating further investment.  The support by SCIF is instrumental in this regard, and is being matched by local, privately donated funds within South Africa.  Thank you to the hunting community for continuing your role in sustainable use conservation,” stated WILD President Vance Martin.

“SCIF is ready to continue our anti-poaching projects throughout Africa and we hope that members of the hunting fraternity will consider making a donation to SCIF, so that we can increase our investments there,” concluded Hosmer.

Recent poaching has again been attributed to a growing international demand for rhino horn in Far East Asia where it is used in traditional medicine.  Professional criminal syndicates are using technology to their advantage, such as helicopters, with the aid of night vision and GPS tracking equipment. WILD’s founder and SCIF’s 2008 International Conservationist of the Year, Dr. Ian Player is leading the grassroots effort in South Africa to help combat the criminal syndicates.

To make a donation to SCIF please contact SCIF’s Development Department at (520) 620-1220 ext. 485 and make your tax deductible gift today.

Contact:  Nelson Freeman, media@safriclub.org or Emily Loose, emily@wild.org

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Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that funds and manages worldwide programs dedicated to wildlife conservation, outdoor education, and humanitarian services. Since 2000, SCIF has provided $47 million to these causes around the world. Visit www.safariclubfoundation.org for more information.

The WILD Foundation – As the hub of the global wilderness conservation movement, The WILD Foundation (a Boulder, Colo based 501(c)3 nonprofit organization) is the only international organization dedicated entirely to wilderness protection around the world. Our vision is to protect at least half of the planet’s land and water in an interconnected way to support all life on Earth – Nature Needs Half™.www.wild.org.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Mr. Joseph Hosmer, President

Safari Club International Foundation

501 2nd St NE

Washington, DC 20002

 

Subject:       Thank You for Your Generous Contribution

Dear Mr. Hosmer and Safari Club International:

I want to extend my sincere gratitude on behalf of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the State of Wisconsin for your recent donation of two used pickup trucks to assist with our Investing in Wisconsin Whitetails Deer Research Projects.  These vehicles are invaluable for our intensive field-based projects and have significantly increased our ability to trap, radio-collar and track deer across our study sites.

 

We have captured 187 deer thus far.  Currently we have radio-collared 134 deer and will be continuing to trap and monitor both adults and newly born fawns this summer.  To address the significant workload involved with our deer projects we are coordinating two UW-Madison graduate students, ten volunteers, an intern, and hundreds of interested volunteers from the public.

 

During the five year duration of this project we will provide Safari Club International (Mr. Matthew Eckert and Dr. Bill Moritz) with semi-annual updates on the progress of the projects and major results.  We also want to thank Dr. Moritz and Mr. Matthew Eckert for their cooperation, interest and assistance with our research efforts.  My staff have commented on how they have been extremely helpful, professional and a pleasure to interact with on deer management issues here in Wisconsin.

 

If you or your staff ever want to visit our research projects here in Wisconsin don’t hesitate to contact either myself or our Science Services Bureau.  We look forward to a long and fruitful relationship with Safari Club International!  Thank You again for your contribution.

 

Sincerely

Cathy Stepp

Secretary, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

 

 

Cc

Karl Martin, Chief Wildlife and Forestry Research Section

Jack Sullivan, Director Bureau of Science Services

Tim Lawhern, Division Administrator, Enforcement and Science

 

Hunting “good” for lion populations?

This week, a coalition of animal rights activists filed a petition with the Department of Interior to list African lions as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act — their latest attempt to impose restrictions on hunters. As usual, the activists use sensationalized, emotional messaging that has nothing to do with the science of wildlife conservation.

Hunters and hunting actually benefit Africa’s lions — as well as its humans. Revenues from hunting generate $200 million annually in remote rural areas of Africa. This revenue gives wildlife value and humans protect the revenue by protecting the wildlife.

Placing African lions on the Endangered Species List will effectively end hunting of the animal. When the conservation and financial incentives that hunting provides are lost or mismanaged, the value local communities place on the sustainability of lion populations greatly diminishes. This leads to humans killing lions as a result of human-lion conflict.

For example, in lion range states where hunting has been banned, cattle herders are using snares and deadly pesticides to poison and kill lions in high numbers in the interest of protecting their own livelihoods. Other resident wildlife also falls to snares and poisons that target lions.

Human-wildlife conflict is a consistent threat across lion range, but people better tolerate coexisting with lions when lions have an economic value. Ending hunting in countries that currently allow it could spell the end of responsible management of lion populations.

Through adaptive management, governments set hunting regulations that are non-detrimental to the health and survival of the game species populations, specifically for lions, as this species generates huge economic revenues for rural communities. Hunting is the most successful tool for maintaining incentives to conserve lions.

We are proud to say that Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) is a true leader in the conservation movement. From the restoration of America’s forests and wildlife at the beginning of the 20th century to the many conservation success stories in Africa today, it has been hunters who have provided the resources to make these successes possible.

SCIF is committed to science-based African lion conservation. We assist lion range states in completing national lion management plans, which allow governments to manage populations in a safe, sustainable manner. Management plans target the immediate threats to lions and provide conservation strategies aimed at addressing these threats. To date, we have assisted Mozambique, Namibia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe in developing their national plans, and have funded the publication of Namibia’s and Zambia’s national lion management plan. SCIF also assisted the regional conservation strategies coauthored by IUCN, Wildlife Conservation Society, and the African Lion Working Group, among other partners.

SCIF also hosts the African Wildlife Consultative Forum, where Southern African nations come together annually to discuss wildlife management issues of mutual concern. African Lion issues have been a feature for several meetings, especially approaches to lion management and human-lion conflict resolution.

As hunters, we stand together to help conserve wildlife and protect our hunting heritage. The persistent misinformation campaigns of extremist animal rights groups like the Humane Society of the United States and the International Fund for Animal Welfare portray hunters as the enemy, when hunters are truly the greatest stewards of our wildlife.

Larry Rudolph is the President of Safari Club International. Joe Hosmer is the President of Safari Club International Foundation.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2011/03/04/why-being-hunted-is-good-for-africas-lions/#ixzz1FfjmXfp8