The Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) and partners are working to advance sound, science-based management of wildlife resources worldwide. SCI Foundation’s Conservation Committee invites you to attend our wildlife conservation-related seminars at the 2013 Safari Club International Convention featuring North American, African and Asian species.  Learn about new ways international hunters are contributing to science-based conservation worldwide. Check out the topics below, spread the word and then drop by and join the discussion! See you in Reno!

Seminars

SCI Foundation Augments Support For AWCF At Embassy Reception

August 13, 2012 – The Embassy of Botswana hosted Safari Club International Foundation (SCI Foundation) and the International Conservation Caucus Foundation (ICCF) for a reception of international Ambassadors and conservationists. The event highlighted the importance of the upcoming African Wildlife Consultative Forum (AWCF) to be hosted in Botswana September 16th through 21st. AWCF brings together the most influential countries in sub-Saharan Africa for a week-long forum discussing wide ranging wildlife management, conservation, and sustainable-use priorities. AWCF provides the only annual opportunity for each country to compare common approaches to the future management of their wildlife resources. SCI Foundation is proud to be the prime catalyst and support base for this invaluable forum to ensure that sustainable use conservation and hunting remain a management priority within each country. The Honorable Ms. Tebelelo Seretse, Ambassador of Botswana, expressed her gratitude to both SCI Foundation and ICCF for the important roles they play in education of broader audiences on all wildlife conservation challenges. SCI Foundation President Joe Hosmer addressed the nearly 100 attendees highlighting the constant demand for conservation incentives to spur economic stability, and SCI Foundation’s anti-poaching projects in Tanzania. SCI Foundation has worked with regional partners to who operate two microlight aircraft to patrol millions of acres to reduce wildlife poaching; it has been very successful. SCI Foundation presented a framed giclee of two battling elephants by acclaimed wildlife artist Brian Jarvi to Ambassador Seretse.

“We would like to thank the Embassy for hosting us tonight and, more importantly, to thank Botswana for hosting the 2012 African Wildlife Consultative Forum. We look forward to Botswana’s continued involvement with AWCF and to continued collaborations on wildlife conservation projects between SCI Foundation and all the nations of Southern Africa,” concluded Hosmer.

To learn more about the African Wildlife Consultative Forum please visit SCI Foundation’s website:http://www.safariclubfoundation.org/content/index.cfm?action=view&content_id=2380.

Safari Club International Foundation To Testify Before House Committee

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Chairman to Highlight Hunting’s Role in Conservation

 
Washington, DC – On Tuesday, June 19, 2012, Safari Club International Foundation (SCI Foundation) Chairman of Conservation & SCI Vice-President, Dr. Al Maki, will testify before the Space, Science, and Technology Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight. The hearing will cover “The Science of How Hunting Assists Species Conservation and Management.”
 
The hearing will seek to highlight the role that sportsmen and women play in wildlife conservation, both domestically and internationally. Dr. Maki will highlight how the Endangered Species Act (ESA) works against hunters and their conservation efforts. He will speak on this issue from the standpoint of both a professional biologist and an avid hunter and conservationist.
 
“Government regulations, whether they are a part of the Endangered Species Act or supported by anti-hunting bureaucrats, should not impede conservation funding,” said Dr. Maki. “Hunters have provided too many resources in the form of excise taxes, license sales, and volunteering with organizations like SCI just to be casually overlooked by policy makers.”
 
Hunters and anglers have voluntarily contributed over $10 billion dollars to conservation efforts through excise taxes alone since the 1937 inception of the Pittman-Robertson Act. They have been, and remain to be, the largest advocates of wildlife conservation. However, their efforts have been largely impeded due to the framework of the ESA.
 
The Fish and Wildlife Service and environmental groups have used the ESA to prevent the use of hunting as a conservation measure. Dr. Maki will present several examples of the ESA’s inefficiency, including how the Act harms species enhancement within the United States and beyond.
 
“We greatly appreciate Congressman Broun and the entire subcommittee’s dedication to address government actions that continually undermine hunter engagement in the conservation of our nation’s wildlife,” concluded Maki.

SCI Foundation Partners With Wisconsin DNR

White-Tailed Deer Predator / Prey Study

For Immediate Release: May 23, 2012

Safari Club International Foundation (SCI Foundation) proudly announced today that it made a donation of $25,000 to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to conduct a white-tailed deer predation study. The SCI Foundation and Wisconsin DNR Predator / Prey study will examine challenges wildlife managers face in finding a balance between predator and prey populations.

“We are proud to partner with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources,” said SCI Foundation President Joseph Hosmer. “State agencies provide the most critical on-the-ground science to improve game management in the United States. By working collaboratively with state agencies we will be building a long term partnership to keep wildlife populations sustainable for future generations of sportsmen and women.”

“This generous donation from the Safari Club International Foundation will be used for field research to assess causes and rates of fawn and adult buck mortality in Wisconsin’s white-tailed deer herd,” said Dr. Karl Martin, Chief Wildlife and Forestry Research Section. “Partnerships like these are the key component to the success of large-scale field research projects.”

The Wisconsin predator / prey study will evaluate the impact of black bear, coyote, wolf, and bobcat populations on white-tailed deer survival and recruitment where fawn survival is low. The outcome of this study will provide decision makers with important science-based evidence to support practical management options for both predators and prey species.

“Collaborative partnerships in the name of conservation help the SCI Foundation ensure a larger impact by making the money spent go further in support of the mission,” concluded Hosmer.

Contact: Nelson Freeman, media@safariclub.org

– SCIF –

Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that funds and manages worldwide programs dedicated to wildlife conservation, outdoor education, and humanitarian services. Since 2000, SCIF has provided $47 million to these causes around the world. Visit www.safariclubfoundation.org for more information.

HUNTING IN BOTSWANA – To Continue!

HUNTING IN BOTSWANA – STATEMENT TO VALUED CLIENTS, AGENTS AND FRIENDS

Over the last 5 years, Botswana’s trophy hunting industry has been subjected to some extensive changes to areas available for hunting, and changes in land use in other areas where photographic and hunting operations have been combined – these changes have given rise to much speculation amongst the international hunting fraternity:  the Botswana Wildlife Management Association wishes to confirm that from the end of this year big game hunting will continue in the following concessions:

Butler & Holbrow Safaris / Chobe Enclave CH1/2 – end of 2013

Calitz Hunting Safaris / Mababe NG 41 – end of 2017

In spite of draconian cuts in quota for other species, elephant remain the flagship species in Botswana and sustainable offtake of this species will continue under the guidance and direction of the Botswana Government.  Recent aerial surveys conducted by independent researchers, in collaboration with Government and the Association, have determined that the Botswana elephant population is stable and in some parts of the country are considered locally over-abundant.   The Special Elephant Quota, which is auctioned annually to industry members and stakeholders, will continue in select areas for the benefit of local communities and for elephant conservation and management as a whole.  Private research on tusk weights/population distribution and densities, supported by outfitters, is ongoing and will continue to inform Botswana’s wildlife Management Authority. 

 Assurances have been made to the industry by senior members of Government during the course of the last five years that elephant hunting will continue in Botswana; in the meantime, outfitters remain committed to ongoing discussion and consultation with Government to determine the way forward.  Hunting on game ranches is unchanged.  Please contact your safari outfitter or the Botswana Wildlife Management Association (botswanawildlife@yahoo.com or debbie@mochaba.net) for any further information or confirmation you may require.

The Botswana Wildlife Management Association

Private Bag 098   Maun    Botswana   Tel:  + 267 6862 671   Fax:  + 267 6862671

Conservation, Education and Entertainment the Focus at EPIC!

 

News For Immediate Release: September 15, 2011

Contact: Jodi Stemler, 703-915-1386 or jodi@stemlerconsulting.com or

 Nelson Freeman, Media@safariclub.org

 

Tucson, Arizona – While fun in the great outdoors will be a centerpiece of the EPIC Outdoor Game Fair, the event will shine a spotlight on the conservation and education leadership of hosts Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) and Quail Unlimited (QU) and their conservation partners. The event will feature displays of conservation organizations including the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Ducks Unlimited, Scholastic Shooting Sports Foundation, as well as SCIF’s Sensory Safari, and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’two-hour Hunter Education review course. In addition there will be numerous seminars, shooting demonstrations and appearances by authorities from across the outdoor industry. The EPIC Outdoor Game Fair will run September 23-25, 2011 at Foxhall Resort and Sporting Club in Douglasville, Georgia.

“With so many great hands-on activities at the EPIC Outdoor Game Fair, participants will have so much fun they won’t even realize they’re learning,” said Joe Hosmer, President of SCIF. “Without sharing a conservation ethic and educating people about fish, wildlife and the natural world, we can’t expect to foster a love for the outdoors or our sporting traditions. That’s the real goal of this event.”

Conservation and education are a key part of the EPIC Outdoor Game Fair because proceeds from the event support Safari Club International Foundation’s (SCIF) efforts to promote science–based conservation through wildlife research, capacity building in governments, youth and teacher education, and humanitarian programs that show the importance of hunting in society. Since 2000, SCIF has provided $47 million to these efforts and recent expenditures have exceeded $5 million annually. SCIF works very closely with many other conservation organizations and many of these partners will also be hosting displays in The Conservation Pavilion at Game Fair.

Educational seminars will go on throughout the weekend in every one of the activity villages. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will be offering a two-hour Hunter Education  course on Sunday, September 25 from 12:30 to 2:30 pm. This 2-hour review course is for hunter education students that have successfully completed either the CD-ROM course or any of the three online courses.  Scott Linden will present his popular Bird Hunting Boot Camp, Bill Oyster will be teaching participants how to construct their own custom bamboo fly rod, C.J. Buck of Buck Knives will provide information about knives and their care, and G.O. and Haley Heath ofFamily Traditions will offer insights on our outdoor traditions. In addition, the Georgia DNR will offer seminars on backyard birding and the snakes of Georgia. EarthQuest’s Birds of Prey village will have regular seminars on falconry and raptors. The Equestrian Village will be constantly busy with demonstrations of various riding disciplines and clinics by top instructors including renowned hunter and equitation trainer, Anna Mullin, and competitors such as Jessie Kuka, world record holder in cowboy mounted shooting.

At the shooting village, there will be instruction by National Sporting Clays Association instructors as well as demonstrations from some of the best shooters in the country. Mossberg’s Red White & Proud Tour featuring Xtreme Sport Shooter Patrick Flanigan will provide fast-paced shooting excitement. Also shooting each day will be Benelli’s Scott Matthews, an amazing freestyle shooter known as “The Sure Shot.”

There will be so much to do and see at the EPIC Outdoor Game Fair that the entire family will be kept busy and learning all weekend long. Time is running out to buy your discounted tickets that are only available online. Go to the EPIC Outdoor Game Fair website(www.epicgamefair.org) to buy them today. As a thank you to our troops serving our nation, active military personnel will receive the same online discount onsite when they present their identification.

Get regular updates on the event blog, EPICGameFairBlog.org, Facebook, Facebook.com/EPICOutdoorGameFair and Twitter,Twitter.com/EPICGameFair.

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Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that funds and manages worldwide programs dedicated to wildlife conservation, outdoor education, and humanitarian services. Since 2000, SCIF has provided $47 million to these causes around the world. Visit www.safariclubfoundation.org for more information.

Quail Unlimited® is the oldest national, nonprofit conservation organization dedicated to the management of America’s wild quail. Known as “America’s Leader In Quail Conservation SM,” QU’s overall vision is to restore America’s quail populations for future generations. The organization’s core values include the wise stewardship of our land and its resources, and the continuation of our proud heritage of conservation, therefore, leaving a legacy and firm foundation for our youth and families to build upon.

Importance of Hunting: Safari Club International Foundation Testifies to US Congress

Original Post available here.

TESTIMONY OF THE SAFARI CLUB INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION

Joseph Hosmer

President, Safari Club International Foundation

Subcommittee for Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans and Insular Affairs;

House Natural Resources Committee

Re: HR 50 – Multinational Species Conservation Funds Reauthorization Act of 2011

July 28, 2011

Good morning, my name is Joe Hosmer, and I am very thankful for the opportunity to speak on behalf of the hunter-conservation community today.

The Safari Club International Foundation (SCIF) is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization that funds and manages programs dedicated to wildlife conservation, outdoor education, and humanitarian services. Since 2000, SCIF has provided in excess of $50 million in support to these causes around the world. SCIF has worked tirelessly to increase wildlife management capability throughout Southern and Eastern Africa through strategic partnerships with African nations and conservation NGOs.

Currently, SCIF participates on the steering committee of the Multinational Species Conservation Fund Coalition and SCIF has participated as a member of the Multinational Species Coalition for well over 10 years. In our current role on the coalition, we assist in providing grassroots support for the species conservation funds.

Safari Club International Foundation believes that the United States plays a pivotal role in international conservation. We further believe that the United States’ continued support for international conservation projects is necessary, both for the continued growth of wildlife populations, and for the stability of rural economies throughout many nations of Africa. For these reasons the Safari Club International Foundation strongly supports HR 50, the Multinational Species Conservation Funds Reauthorization Act of 2011.

As an organization, SCIF is highly committed to wildlife conservation throughout the world, but we have a particular affection and interest for African wildlife species. I would like to offer the hunting community’s perspective on the importance of investing in conservation funding internationally. There is a tremendous return on investment that rural economies realize through effective sustainable use practices for wildlife management.

SCIF’s Conservation Committee dedicates over a million dollars annually to global wildlife conservation, with a specific focus on conserving African species. SCIF’s leadership in Africa has led to the development of the African Wildlife Consultative Forum, which brings together African wildlife officials, representatives of the African professional hunter associations, international NGO’s and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services staff. At these meetings we have increased collaboration for sustainable use conservation programs, and we have improved relations to increase rural economic development around sustainable hunting.

Other speakers today will touch on the incredible impact that the conservation funds have made for wildlife populations. I would like to speak specifically about the impact on rural economies that sustainable use and conservation of these species can have.

The role of sport hunting today in many developing countries is vital to the very survival of communities. Using southern Africa as an example, sport hunting has been one of the main economic engines in rural communities. In many countries of southern Africa, agrarian or pastoral economies cannot flourish, due to limited land suitable for agriculture or grazing. In these areas, regulated sport hunting has been a consistent form of revenue for local communities. To take better advantage of sustainable wildlife use, many governments have begun Community Based Natural Resources Programs. These programs, in essence, devolve power from the central government so that locally created community councils can regulate and manage wildlife in their areas. Their mission is to utilize wildlife so that it remains a sustainable resource for their community.

Successful community based programs have been developed across Africa including, but not limited to, Communal Areas Management Program for Indigenous Resources, otherwise known as CAMPFIRE, in Zimbabwe; Living In a Finite Environment, known as LIFE in Namibia; and other programs in Zambia, Botswana and Tanzania.

These programs create an incentive for rural communities to actively conserve wildlife. Revenue retention schemes ensure that money generated from sport hunting ends up in the hands of indigenous people. In the case of sport hunting in southern Africa, communities in the most rural portions of countries reap the benefit of conserving wildlife through Community Based Natural Resource Programs.

Here are some facts and figures on the positive economic impact that sport hunting has in Africa.

1. International hunting by 18,500 hunters generates $200 million USD annually in remote rural areas of Africa in 23 countries. Private hunting operations conserve wildlife on 540,000 square miles, which is 22% more land mass than is found in all the national parks of Africa. (Lindsey, Conservation Biology, 2007)

2. “Hunting is of key importance to conservation in Africa by creating [financial] incentives to promote and retain wildlife as a land use over vast areas…” (National Geographic News, March, 2007)

3. In Namibia, 29 conservancies involve almost 150,000 rural individuals through trophy hunting, conservancy management or secondary industries. (Weaver, C.L. & Skyer, P. 2003.)

4. The Zambian Wildlife Authority works with safari operators to ensure that as part of their contract they must develop and manage roads, employ Zambian Professional Hunters or Apprentice Hunters, ensure that a minimum of 80% of labor comes from neighboring

communities, develop local infrastructure, notably schools, clinic and wells, and employ Zambian game scouts to manage wildlife and poaching. (Kampamba, G. 2005.)

5. International hunting employs approximately 3,700 people annually in Tanzania. (www.tanzania.go.tz/) and supports over 88,000 families (Hurt & Ravn 2000)

Particularly in Africa, creating an incentive to coexist with wildlife has been a central reason why so many populations of species are now thriving. Elephants, rhinos and lions are the best examples of this dynamic at work. Of the 23 southern African nations that have regulated hunting, an overall trend of positive species population growth has been reported. The growing population of white rhino has been one of the most notable success stories. Unsurprisingly, in countries like Kenya, where wildlife utilization by indigenous people is extremely limited and where hunting does not exist, wildlife population levels are now low and in continuous decline. Trophy hunting in Kenya was banned in 1977 and this ban has resulted in an accelerated loss of wildlife due to the removal of incentives for conservation (Baker 1997; Lewis & Jackson 2005).

As an organization, SCIF has not directly utilized the funds made available through the authorizing legislation. However, organizations that SCIF has partnered with in providing matching grants have been recipients of funding from the FWS.

The investments that the U.S. government has made through the multination species conservation funds are necessary. They provide stability and continuity for ongoing wildlife conservation investments from other organizations, and from the hunters who travel to Africa. The MSCF certainly provides significant and measurable successes for a very small investment of federal dollars.

I appreciate the opportunity to speak before the subcommittee today.

The above testimony, from a July 28th hearing held by the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee, can be downloaded in full here. The Safari Club International Foundation’s press release on the hearing, released July 28th, can be downloadedhere. The Safari Club International Foundation is an ICCF Advisory Council member.